Climate change will alter rainfall patterns in New England in the coming decades. Storms will likely become more intense, increasing the frequency of flooding. This leaves many agricultural lands, especially those in floodplains, at risk. Farms in New England tend to be concentrated in river valleys because the soils are fertile and easily cultivated. Thus, many farms in this area are vulnerable to floods.
Increasing humidity and precipitation and rising extreme temperatures are having negative impacts across the Midwest. Integrating climate adaptation into planning processes can help build adaptive capacity to increase climate resilience. The U.S. Climate Resiliency Toolkit for the Midwest Region is an excellent resource to find case studies, tools, expertise and steps to resilience to plan adaptation to a changing climate in many sectors, including agriculture. 
The Southeast Climate Hub co-hosted a free Hurricane Resilience Workshop to share first-hand information, and develop a Technical Manual to assist information sharing from Extension to land managers. View presentations from the workshop.

Map of United States defining the geographic region covered by each climate hub

 

Recent Additions

Climate change will alter rainfall patterns in New England in the coming decades. Storms will likely become more intense, increasing the frequency of flooding. This leaves many agricultural lands, especially those in floodplains, at risk. Farms in New England…
Dust emission from cropland and rangeland is problematic in many areas, particularly where dry conditions and high wind velocities exist. Producers and specialists need a resource with in-depth solutions to specific dust and wind erosion problems. For a…
The Climate Adaptation Fellowship is a series of curricula designed to give farmers, foresters, and advisors the information they need to adapt to climate change, bring climate change into their outreach programs, and talk about climate change with peers and…
A two-day event geared towards all things agriculture and water-use efficiency.
The USDA Midwest Climate Hub and the Indiana State Climate Office (at Purdue) will provide a 1.5 day workshop on regional research, management, and monitoring needs with an emphasis on herbicide/pesticide drift issues.