Temperature

Since 1901, temperatures have risen in many parts of the world. Since 1970, the pace of this trend has accelerated. Increases in average global temperatures are expected to be within the range of 0.5°F to 8.6°F by 2100, with a likely increase of at least 2.7°F for all scenarios except the one representing the most aggressive mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions according to IPCC (2013). High and low temperatures are also predicted to increase, which may have negative consequences for agricultural production and forest heath. Increasing high temperatures can hurt both crop pollination and fruit development. While crop growth can continue at high daily maximum temperatures, fruit production and pollination are more sensitive. The end result may be lower yields of marketable crops, and reduced income for farmers. 

Warmer temperatures around the globe lead to stronger storms and heat waves, and more of them. Though there will likely be more average rainfall world-wide, some areas can expect to see a greater increase than others. Higher temperatures in some regions areas will intensify drought. This may increase the need for irrigation and other adaptive practices on farms.

It’s important to properly plan an urban forest first in order to ensure the greatest chance of success. Location, planting timing, and tree species are all important aspects of a plan. To assist planners, West Virginia Division of Forestry recently updated two …

Climate change is a global challenge. It has the potential to impact environmental, animal, and human health, as well as the economy. The food production sector is particularly susceptible to changes in the climate. These changes have far-reaching societal impacts such as…

As significant impacts of climate change on natural systems are already evident, it is important to understand how climate change will continue and potentially intensity with time. The USDA Office of Sustainability and Climate has developed an interactive storymap to show what…

The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) offers cost sharing for practices that help farmers increase resilience to drought. For more information about NRCS Drought assistance, including how to find your local NRCS office, check out 5 Steps for Assistance.…

Nurseries and greenhouses are intensive production spaces where careful water management is critical to business. As the climate changes, there will be more periods of hot and dry weather in the region. Efficiently managing water resources will be essential to maintaining…

Keeping cows cool in the summertime is a major concern for dairy farmers, even in the relatively moderate climate of the Northeast. During humid heatwaves, temperature and humidity levels can rise above a cow’s comfort zone, leading to heat stress. When heat stress occurs, dairy…

The USDA Midwest Climate Hub and the Indiana State Climate Office at Purdue University will provide a 1.5 day workshop on regional research, management and monitoring needs with an emphasis on herbicide/pesticide drift issues. The ADIM workshop will take place from TBD at the…

2019 has proven to be an extreme year weather-wise here in the Midwest--from extreme cold in January, the Bomb Cyclone in March, and tornadoes in April to extensive rain and subsequent flooding in May and June. The Midwest states are no strangers to disaster. As we look back on…

Taking action now can help forested watersheds prepare for and adapt to a changing climate. Forested watersheds improve water quality and enhance water storage, naturally regulate streamflows, reduce flood damages and stormwater runoff, replenish groundwater and provide a…