Temperature

Since 1901, temperatures have risen in many parts of the world. Since 1970, the pace of this trend has accelerated. Increases in average global temperatures are expected to be within the range of 0.5°F to 8.6°F by 2100, with a likely increase of at least 2.7°F for all scenarios except the one representing the most aggressive mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions according to IPCC (2013). High and low temperatures are also predicted to increase, which may have negative consequences for agricultural production and forest heath. Increasing high temperatures can hurt both crop pollination and fruit development. While crop growth can continue at high daily maximum temperatures, fruit production and pollination are more sensitive. The end result may be lower yields of marketable crops, and reduced income for farmers. 

Warmer temperatures around the globe lead to stronger storms and heat waves, and more of them. Though there will likely be more average rainfall world-wide, some areas can expect to see a greater increase than others. Higher temperatures in some regions areas will intensify drought. This may increase the need for irrigation and other adaptive practices on farms.

The USDA Midwest Climate Hub and the Indiana State Climate Office at Purdue University will provide a 1.5 day workshop on regional research, management and monitoring needs with an emphasis on herbicide/pesticide drift issues.  This workshop will provide “science-to-services”…

Keeping cows cool in the summertime is a major concern for dairy farmers, even in the relatively moderate climate of the Northeast. During humid heatwaves, temperature and humidity levels can rise above a cow’s comfort zone, leading to heat stress. When heat stress occurs, dairy…

2019 has proven to be an extreme year weather-wise here in the Midwest--from extreme cold in January, the Bomb Cyclone in March, and tornadoes in April to extensive rain and subsequent flooding in May and June. The Midwest states are no strangers to disaster. As we look back on…

Taking action now can help forested watersheds prepare for and adapt to a changing climate. Forested watersheds improve water quality and enhance water storage, naturally regulate streamflows, reduce flood damages and stormwater runoff, replenish groundwater and provide a myriad…

Capstone students are helping us hear the stories of farmers who are adapting to climate change The Public Communication Capstone is a service-learning course at the University of Vermont (UVM). The USDA Northeast Climate Hub partnered with a team of Capstone students in Spring…

The following Symposium will take place at the National Adaptation Forum on Tuesday, April 23rd from 1100-1230.   Improving Decision-Making Through Regional Collaboration Success in obtaining resilient and sustainable agroecosystems within the Midwest Region can only be…

Drought Impact Reporter The National Drought Mitigation Center’s Drought Impact Reporter tracks the impact of in various ways, including scanning media for reports about drought impacts, and collecting and mapping observations of drought-related conditions and impacts from…

This year is different for Cecarelli Farms. In late January 2018, Nelson Cecarelli passed away after a battle with cancer. His legacy of agricultural stewardship and passion for farming continue through his business partner and friend, Will DellaCamera. Over the past 20 years,…

Climate change poses both risks and opportunities for Northeast growers. A trend toward shorter, milder winters leads to longer growing seasons and potential for new crops and varieties for local markets. However, these seasonal shifts may also benefit many insect pests and be…