Mitigation

Mitigation focuses on reducing atmospheric greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, that cause climate change. Systems may need help adapting to climate change, but they already play a crucial role in mitigation efforts. When managing ecosystems, greenhouse gas mitigation can be incorporated as a management goal, similar to goals for improving water quality or providing recreation opportunities. Mitigation options for land management include reducing the amount of carbon emissions by storing or sequestering additional carbon, providing renewable energy from biomass, or avoiding carbon losses. 

Many land and animal management technologies and practices can help reduce GHG emissions. USDA provides information to help land managers assess which mitigation technologies and practices might be appropriate to their operation.

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Together, we envision a better way to support peer-to-peer climate adaptation. The Climate Adaptation Fellowship is a series of curricula designed to give farmers, foresters, and advisors the information they need to adapt to climate change, bring climate change into their…

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Content excerpted from "Carbon Benefits of Wood-based Products and Energy" on the USFS Climate Change Resource Center and the USFS report Considering Forest and Grassland Carbon in Land Management (WO-GTR-95). Issues Management activities can have a substantial effect on…

Some content excerpted from "Carbon and Land Management" on the USFS Climate Change Resource Center and the USFS report Considering Forest and Grassland Carbon in Land Management (WO-GTR-95).   Forests play a critical role in mitigating climate change by capturing carbon…

The Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) is a highly destructive plant pest of foreign origin. It was first found in the United States in 1916 and has since spread to most states east of, and immediately to the west of, the Mississippi River. It has also spread to some…

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It is important to continue to find ways to mitigate or adapt to climate change. One of the most effective strategies is to teach younger generations about taking care of the planet. At the University of Massachusetts (UMass), food is grown at five permaculture gardens. …

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