Research & Data

group of people looking at fieldClimate change is expected to make agricultural production more uncertain leaving producers and land managers to adapt to new and changing weather patterns and markets. Regionally significant research and data improve knowledge of the effects of climate change and provide sustainable solutions for producers and land managers.

Regional data and research are used to create decision-support resources (i.e. informational products and tools created to help producers adapt to the effects of a changing climate). These decision-making resources are built on research and data such as climate modeling and analysis, climate trends and variations, greenhouse gas monitoring, climate data scenarios, and historical climate data and research.

These decision-support resources assist producers, enabling them to establish economic opportunities, proactively manage risks, reduce impacts and costs over time, and sustain agricultural yields in a changing climate.

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Increasing humidity and precipitation and rising extreme temperatures are having negative impacts across the Midwest. Integrating climate adaptation into planning processes can help build adaptive capacity to increase climate resilience. The U.S. Climate Resiliency Toolkit for…

Maine is a state known for its long, cold winters and short growing season, but changes in climate are disrupting this norm. Many growers around the state have already started to experience the trend towards longer growing seasons. This includes slightly warmer summers and…

Saltwater flooding, due to sea level rise and more frequent and intense storm events, has become an increasing problem for farmers near coastal lands. (Bay Journal, March 2019). The Mid-Atlantic States of the eastern U.S. are being especially affected by coastal flooding due to…

Keeping cows cool in the summertime is a major concern for dairy farmers, even in the relatively moderate climate of the Northeast. During humid heatwaves, temperature and humidity levels can rise above a cow’s comfort zone, leading to heat stress. When heat stress occurs, dairy…

Many Rhode Island farmers plant winter cover crops, such as winter rye (Secale cereale). The plants help to reduce soil erosion, improve soil quality, and provide other benefits. Summer cover crops traditionally have not been used in Rhode Island because of the short summer…

One third of all of our food comes from pollinated crops.  Because increasing temperatures impact both plants and the pollinators they rely on, climate change poses a dual threat to crop production. Shifts in dates when plants flower or pollinators are present could…

Warmer temperatures and longer growing seasons offer Pennsylvania dairy farmers the ability to plant more than one crop in a season. But increasing frequency of extreme rainfall presents new challenges. Double cropping with winter annuals can increase forage production and…

Some content excerpted from "Carbon and Land Management" on the USFS Climate Change Resource Center and the USFS report Considering Forest and Grassland Carbon in Land Management (WO-GTR-95).   Forests play a critical role in mitigating climate change by capturing carbon…

Growing Season Length Warmer temperatures have resulted in a longer freeze-free season and longer growing season across the region (Frumhoff et al. 2007, Kunkel et al. 2013). The freeze-free season, which is the period between the last occurrence of 32 °F in the spring and the…