Livestock

In general, livestock such as poultry and swine are managed in housed, temperature controlled systems. Adjusting these systems to adapt to outside temperature changes may mitigate some of the negative impacts of climate change. However, despite current technologies to manage livestock temperatures, high summer temperatures sill cost swine producers over $300 million every year. As livestock producers adapt to climate change, management and energy costs associated with increased temperature regulation will likely increase. In the future, producers may consider selecting breeds and breed types that are genetically adapted to changed climate conditions.

Precision ranching (PR) is the use of smart sensors for automated monitoring of livestock and other important components of ranching such as stock tanks  and drinkers, rainfall, and forage growth. Precision systems are fairly common in intensive animal agriculture but their use…

Raramuri Criollo is a Bos taurus biotype with characteristics that are showing promise for profitable and sustainable production in the arid US Southwest. On-ranch research has shown that compared with breeds commonly used in the Southwest, Raramuri Criollo travel greater…

From grazinglands to feedyards, US beef production systems are expected to meet new global beef demands while sustaining environmental quality. These opportunities and challenges are manifest in the American Southwest and Ogallala Aquifer region, neighboring regions connected…

Livestock grazing plays an important role in the tribal economies within the Great Basin states, but as the climate continues to warm and water resources decrease, innovative grazing strategies will become critical to sustain healthy rangelands and the complex social and…

The Southeast Climate Hub partnered with the University of Florida to host a free Building Agricultural Resilience to Hurricanes Workshop on November 15, 2018 in Gainesville, Florida. The workshop brought together over 60 USDA, Extension, and research professionals to discuss…

The USDA Northern Plains Climate Hub (NPCH) contributed, as coauthors, to three articles in as special issue of the journal of Climatic Change on the "Vulnerability Assessment of US Agriculture and Forests developed by the USDA Climate Hubs" (January 2018, Volume 146, Issue…

Capstone students are helping us hear the stories of farmers who are adapting to climate change The Public Communication Capstone is a service-learning course at the University of Vermont (UVM). The USDA Northeast Climate Hub partnered with a team of Capstone students in Spring…

Increased climate variability, including more frequent and intense drought, is projected for the  southwestern region of the United States. Increased temperatures and reduced precipitation lower soil water availability resulting in decreased plant productivity and altering…

In 2015, the Southwest and California Climate Hubs published a report describing the potential vulnerability of crops, forests and animal agriculture to climate-driven environmental changes. The exposure of specific sectors of the agricultural and forestry industries varies…