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Sensitivities A. There will be increased opportunity for invasive species establishment with increased disturbance and shifting plant species composition under changing climate. B. Climate change may lead to loss of climatically suitable habitat for persistent pinyon-juniper ecosystems.
Content produced by the Northwest Climate Hub
Sensitivities A. More wildfire and insect outbreaks will increase loss of late-successional forest habitat and connectivity. B. Loss of habitat structure and spatial heterogeneity will increase species vulnerability to changing climate. C. Higher temperature and increased disturbance will cause shifts in ranges of plant and animal species. D. A warmer climate will potentially convert drier forest types (e.g., ponderosa pine) to shrubland or grassland
Content produced by the Northwest Climate Hub
Sensitivities A. Warming temperatures will lead to longer fire seasons, increased wildfire frequency, and increased area burned across the western U.S. B. There will be increased opportunity for invasive species establishment with increased disturbance and shifting plant species composition in a changing climate. C. The potential for mortality events and regeneration failures will increase in a warming climate with increased fire, drought, insect outbreaks, and interactions among disturbances.
Content produced by the Northwest Climate Hub
Sensitivities A. Increased flood frequency and higher peak flows may reduce egg-fry survival for fall spawners and yearling parr winter survival. B. Increased sedimentation in streams will accompany increased flooding and wildfire. C. Lower low flows in summer will reduce fish habitat quality. D. Lower low flows in summer will increase pre-spawn mortality for summer run and stream-type salmon and steelhead.
Content produced by the Northwest Climate Hub
The Northern Forests of the Midwest and Northeast regions are home to a diversity of ecosystems and tree species. Anticipated climate change effects, such as increased temperatures, extended growing season, variable precipitation, reduced snowpack and earlier melt, and episodic precipitation events, can interact to increase drought risk and put stress on forest ecosystems.
Content produced by the Northern Forests Climate Hub
Forests of the Midwest and Northeast significantly define the character, culture, and economy of this large region but face an uncertain future as the climate continues to change. How are forests vulnerable to climate change? Forests vary widely across the region, and vulnerabilities are strongly influenced by regional differences in climate impacts and adaptive capacity. Not all forests are vulnerable; longer growing seasons and warmer temperatures will increase suitable habitat and biomass for many temperate species.
Content produced by the Northern Forests Climate Hub
Pigs are not native to the Americas, they originated in southeast Asia and from there expanded their range through Eurasia and North Africa1. Humans are responsible for introducing pigs everywhere else. In what is now the United States, pigs were first introduced by Polynesian settlers on the Hawaiian Islands 800 - 1000 years ago. Domesticated pigs arrived on the mainland in the 16th century, brought by European explorers and settlers2.
Content produced by the Southwest Climate Hub
Tree planting is a tangible action that can retain and increase carbon storage on natural lands. Planting trees is one of many actions that we can take to address climate change that can also help to promote resilient, healthy, and productive forests and communities.
Content produced by the Northern Forests Climate Hub
Sensitivity A. Reduced snowpack, shifts in hydrologic regime involving changes in timing and magnitude of streamflows, and changing groundwater recharge and discharge will likely lead to shifts in plant species composition and reduced habitat quality in riparian areas, wetlands, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems.  
Content produced by the Northwest Climate Hub
How are forests vulnerable to climate change? The urban forest of the Chicago Wilderness region, a 7-million-acre area covering portions of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin, will face direct and indirect impacts from a changing climate over the 21st century. Understanding the potential impacts is an important first step to sustaining healthy forests in the face of changing conditions.
Content produced by the Northern Forests Climate Hub