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The Cooperative Extension System bridges the gap between each state’s land-grant university (LGU) and its people. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Cooperative Extension translates university research so that trusted knowledge can be put into practice. Cooperative Extension has a presence in every U.S. state and territory. It is able to effectively bring cutting-edge research-based programming, resources, and educational opportunities to individuals, communities, and businesses.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
What educational resources are available?
Content produced by the Northern Forests Climate Hub
Farming can be a challenging occupation here in the Midwest. Producers, ranchers and their families face many difficulties that can lead to stress: financial problems, marketing uncertainties, production challenges, mental health issues, social pressures and natural disasters (select to see disaster resources).
Content produced by the Midwest Climate Hub
A report now details the findings from the USDA Northeast Climate Hub's Capacity Discovery project.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
April 26 - Considerations Before Turning Cattle Out to Graze presented by Krista Ehlert, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Range Specialist, Jameson Brennan, Assistant Professor/Research and Extension Specialist-Livestock Grazing, and Adele Harty, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist and
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Content produced by the Northern Plains Climate Hub
April 12 - Seed Treatments and Other Early Season Pest Considerations presented by Adam Varenhorst, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Field Crop Entomologist; Fungicide Seed Treatment Considerations Under Dry Soil Conditions, Emmanuel Byamukama, Associate Professor & SDSU Extension Plant Pathologist, Adam Var
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Content produced by the Northern Plains Climate Hub
What educational resources are available?
Content produced by the Northern Forests Climate Hub
October 26, 2020 AT 1PM EST Through a case study from Washington, DC, participants will learn how to get feedback from historically underrepresented groups and tailor cooperative extension programs to people of different races, ages, and academic backgrounds. Some people, such as minorities and those from less educated or lower income backgrounds, are typically excluded from conversations surrounding the degradation and improvement of ecosystem structure
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Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
Warmer temperatures and longer growing seasons offer Pennsylvania dairy farmers the ability to plant more than one crop in a season. But increasing frequency of extreme rainfall presents new challenges. Double cropping with winter annuals can increase forage production and help minimize off-farm feed purchases. It also provides protection from soil erosion and helps reduce nutrient losses.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
Climate change poses both risks and opportunities for Northeast growers. A trend toward shorter, milder winters leads to longer growing seasons and potential for new crops and varieties for local markets. However, these seasonal shifts may also benefit many insect pests and be harmful for some pollinator species. Researchers from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) are looking at ways that growers might adapt to and take advantage of current and expected climate conditions. Check out the research taking place at this New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station farm.