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We work together to make climate information accessible. The USDA Northeast Climate Hub is a partnership of numerous government agencies, land grant universities, Tribes, and nonprofits. The formation of our partner network stands out as one of our greatest successes and assets. Our network provides the foundation for knowledge sharing and collaboration opportunity.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
Maine is a state known for its long, cold winters and short growing season, but changes in climate are disrupting this norm. Many growers around the state have already started to experience the trend towards longer growing seasons. This includes slightly warmer summers and slightly milder winters. Some farmers are now able to grow crops year-round by using high tunnel houses. However, with this opportunity also comes a cost.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
April 19 - Focus on Numbers for Drought Plan presented by Jack Davis, SDSU Extension Crops Business Management Field Specialist, and Climate Update presented by Laura Edwards, SDSU Extension State Climatologist
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Content produced by the Northern Plains Climate Hub
Nutrient and water management, pests, diseases, and weeds—these are some of the issues farmers consider when implementing production practices. In parallel to this, a traditional Extension program typically houses a soil scientist, an entomologist, a plant pathologist, and a weed scientist. However, some states don’t have the resources to hire a specialist in each of these areas.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
Justin Mount, USDA Midwest Climate Hub NRCS Liaison and Natural Resource Specialist, will be presenting at The National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA) annual Meeting/Professional Improvement Conference in Fort Wayne, IN that takes place from Sept 8-12, 2019. 
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Content produced by the Midwest Climate Hub
Select presenter name in list below to locate their bio: Hannah Aitken Suzanne Baker Sonja Birthisel John Bombardiere Lori Brewer Kevin Brinson Katherine Bunting-Howarth
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
As the climate changes, regions that were once too cold for some tree species to grow are now becoming suitable habitat. At the same time, other regions are becoming too warm for certain cold-hardy species to thrive. Many orchards and farms in the Northeast are coping with changing weather patterns, increased pest and weed pressures, and unpredictable market conditions. Diversifying the site by planting more than one species of tree or crop can increase the farm’s resilience to change.
Content produced by the Northeast Climate Hub
In January, the Sustainable Southwest Beef Project team introduced the project to roughly 125 ranchers, feedlot operators and others connected to the beef cattle industry at the Southwest Beef Symposium, organized by New Mexico State University and Texas A&M University.
Content produced by the Southwest Climate Hub
Farmers have been adapting to climatic conditions for centuries often using irrigation as an adaptation tool. In the Northwest climate models project warmer and slightly drier summers and a reduction in summer water availability due to increasing winter temperatures that will lead to more precipitation in the form of rain rather than snow, reducing snowpack. Thus, climate change may limit irrigation as a viable adaptation tool for many western producers.
Content produced by the Northwest Climate Hub